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Techniques in Counseling and Therapy phototherapy

Techniques “phototherapy” use personal photos of patients and family albums – and their interactions with these visual catalysts – to evoke therapeutically relevant memories, feelings and information that is contained in the images unconsciously.

The Secret Lives of personal photos and family albums

Each photograph a person takes is also a form of self-portrait, a kind of “mirror with memory” reflecting those moments that were special enough to be frozen in time forever. Collectively, these photos make visible the stories that happened in the life of the person, serving as footprints that mark where it has been (emotionally and physically) and perhaps also are pointing toward where they are likely heading soon. Even with the reactions to postcards, magazine pictures, and photos taken by others, can provide clues that Hechen light on his inner life and its secrets.

The actual meaning of the photos is not so much in its visual factors, but in what these details evoke in the mind (and heart) of each viewer. By looking at a photograph, people generally spontaneously create the meaning that they believe this coming from the picture itself, and this meaning may or may not be the photographer originally intended to convey. So your message (and emotional “message”) depends on who is watching, because perceptions of people and their life experiences automatically fall and define what is seen as real. Thus, the reactions of people to the photos ecuentran special can actually reveal a lot about themselves, if only the right questions are asked.

How practitioners use pictures to help people improve their lives

Most people have pictures in their environment, without really stopping to consider why. But because these are permanent records of daily moments (and associated emotions that are unconsciously rooted them), personal photos can serve as natural bridges to access, explore and communicate about our feelings and memories (even those that are buried deep or forgotten long ago), along with other topics of therapeutic interest are brought to light by them. Therapists found that photos of patients often act as concrete symbols themselves and transitional metaphoric objects that silently offer a way to look inside themselves in a way that verbal methods can not fully represent or deconstruct.

With the help of a therapist trained to use the techniques of light therapy, patients can explore how they treat emotional level, apart visually, personal and meaningful photos from the family album. This information is latent in all personal photos of patients, but when they can be used to focus and precipitate therapeutic dialogue, usually can be a direct connection and less censured with the unconscious.

During phototherapy sessions, the photos are not just observed passively in silent contemplation, but are also actively taken, inns, spoken, heard, reconstructed, revised to form or illustrate new narratives, re-visualized in memory or imagination , integrated with expressions of art therapy, or even put into dialogue with other pictures.

What are the techniques phototherapy?

Techniques phototherapy involve photos taken, views, inns, actively reconstructed, worked through memory or imagination, and likewise, explored during interactions with images “found” that were created by other people (including images of magazines, postcards , etc.).

There are five basic techniques that are interrelated and are frequently used in a combination, and sometimes along with other techniques of expressive therapies such as the “art therapy” or “drama therapy “:

    1. Patient photos taken by others (inns or spontaneous);
    2. Photos taken by the patient (using a camera, or “taken” to collect images removed others);
    3. Auto portraits (which are really patient photos taken by himself – ie photos where they had the power and total control to self-direct all options resulting in the creation of the image);
    4. Family-autobiographical Photos (either family of origin or family by choice, the photos are traditionally stored in albums or more loosely telling a narrative to be arranged on the walls, on desks, in wallets, in the refrigerator door, etc.);

… And the latter technique, which is the basis of all of the above and in turn connects (but must be taught separately to explain)

  1. “Photo-Projective” based on the process (phenomenological) by which the meaning of any picture is at least partially created by the observer during the process of perceiving. The interpretation of any photo may be different every time you look at it, as well as the interpretation will be different from person to person; at work phototherapy is useful to help patients realize their interpretation of the meaning of any photo (or response to a person) is selectively driven, personal and unconsciously.

Phototherapy – The largest image

The book, PhotoTherapy Techniques – Exploring the Secrets of Personal Snapshots and Family Albums explains that phototherapy is better understood as a system of techniques of counseling based on photographs used by health workers as part of their therapeutic practice in helping their patients consciously explore and subsequently cognitively reintegrate, their insights that were precipitated by the photos in such a way that helps them to better understand and improve their lives.

So it’s not the same ” Therapeutic Photography ” (which is sometimes confusingly called phototherapy, particularly in England), as it relates to self-conducted activities done outside of a formal counseling context. People use Therapeutic Photography for their own process autodescubrimento or artistic purposes, whereas therapists use phototherapy to help other people (patients) who need help with their problems. While the results do self-examinations based on photographs (photography-as-therapy) often ends up being “therapeutic” in itself, especially when the camera as an agent of personal or social change is used, this is not the same as activate and process these experiences under the guidance and care of a professional trained in counseling (picture-in-therapy).

As phototherapy is used as a set of flexible and interrelated technical, rather than fixed directives based on a specific modality or theoretical paradigm, can be used by anyone trained to be a counselor or therapist, regardless of their conceptual orientation or professional approach preferably. This is one of the many ways in which phototherapy is somewhat similar and yet different from Art Therapy – as is also one of the reasons can be successfully used by a variety of other health workers who are not trained specifically in Art Therapy.

Since phototherapy is based on photography-as-communication rather than photography-as-art is not required to have previous experience with cameras or the photographic art so that it can be used in therapeutically effective.

And finally, because phototherapy involves people interacting with their own unique visual constructions about reality (using photography more as an active verb rather than as a passive / reflective pronoun), these techniques can be particularly successful for used with people for whom verbal communication is physically or mentally limited, for socio-culturally marginalized people, or situationally inappropriate, not understanding the nonverbal cues.

Then phototherapy may be especially useful, and usually very enriching, in applications with multicultural people, people with disabilities, minorities, people with special needs, and other similarly complex populations, as well can also be beneficial in diversity training, resolution conflict mediation on divorce, and other related fields.

Now that the general public is becoming more comfortable with the use of electronic technology and digital images, more exciting possibilities open to use photographs as a tool in counseling to help patients who have scanners or websites on their families or those who can participate in online cyber-therapy.

• Please explore this website further to learn more about how phototherapy can help people have a better image about their lives – a picture worth – as the proverb says a thousand words …

We recommend that you contact the www.nlpcoaching.com (NLP COACHING) with questions or for more information or training and also to recommend additional publications, or contribute their own commentary on the book ” PhotoTherapy Techniques “provide news or suggestions about additional contacts, share stories photographic, or send any feedback to this site.